homesickforscotland
historicalfirearms:

The Union Between Scotland & England
The relationship between England and Scotland has been a long and tempestuous one.  Even if we simply examine the last 300 years the relationship between the two has been uneasy.  The first joining of nations came in 1603, with the union of the two crowns when James VI of Scotland succeeded the heirless Elizabeth I to become James I of England.  Despite numerous calls for a union of the two countries’ parliaments over the next century, and the brief union of the two nations imposed by Oliver Cromwell’s Commonwealth during the 1650s, it would not be until 1707 that the political union would take place following the economic impact of Scotland’s failed Darien Expedition. 
Even once united politically the Union remained tenuous as political crisis gripped Britain during the late 17th century.  In 1715 and again in 1745 major rebellions took place in aid of the Jacobite cause, these however were brutally suppressed by Britain.  By the late 18th and early 19th Century the political landscape had settled with Scots becoming some of the period’s key figures including General James Abercrombie, Admiral Thomas Cochrane, Chancellor Henry Brougham and Keir Hardie among innumerable others from almost every field from the arts to law, from architecture to science.  
Despite a number of moves during the mid 20th century by the British government to devolve power north it was not until 1999, that the first Scottish Parliament was formed.  2007 saw the Scottish Independence Party come to power for the first time and by 2011 the calls for a referendum on independence had gained momentum.  In 2012 it was agreed by both governments to hold a vote to allow the people of Scotland to decided their future.  The referendum saw the Scottish people vote in favour of remaining within the Union.  However, increased devolution was promised by the British Government and the next nine months will see negotiation over the details of increased home rule.  In turn the referendum has spurred calls for increased local powers and franchise for both England and Wales with calls for each to have their own individual parliaments deciding on regional matters while the Union Parliament decides on matters of national and international importance. With next years general election this is likely to become a key issue in deciding the political landscape.

Image:  Treaty of Union which agreed the terms of the Union between England and Scotland, it was made law when the Acts of Union were assented to by the English and Scottish parliaments in 1706 and 1707 respectively. (source)

historicalfirearms:

The Union Between Scotland & England

The relationship between England and Scotland has been a long and tempestuous one.  Even if we simply examine the last 300 years the relationship between the two has been uneasy.  The first joining of nations came in 1603, with the union of the two crowns when James VI of Scotland succeeded the heirless Elizabeth I to become James I of England.  Despite numerous calls for a union of the two countries’ parliaments over the next century, and the brief union of the two nations imposed by Oliver Cromwell’s Commonwealth during the 1650s, it would not be until 1707 that the political union would take place following the economic impact of Scotland’s failed Darien Expedition. 

Even once united politically the Union remained tenuous as political crisis gripped Britain during the late 17th century.  In 1715 and again in 1745 major rebellions took place in aid of the Jacobite cause, these however were brutally suppressed by Britain.  By the late 18th and early 19th Century the political landscape had settled with Scots becoming some of the period’s key figures including General James Abercrombie, Admiral Thomas Cochrane, Chancellor Henry Brougham and Keir Hardie among innumerable others from almost every field from the arts to law, from architecture to science.  

Despite a number of moves during the mid 20th century by the British government to devolve power north it was not until 1999, that the first Scottish Parliament was formed.  2007 saw the Scottish Independence Party come to power for the first time and by 2011 the calls for a referendum on independence had gained momentum.  In 2012 it was agreed by both governments to hold a vote to allow the people of Scotland to decided their future.  The referendum saw the Scottish people vote in favour of remaining within the Union.  However, increased devolution was promised by the British Government and the next nine months will see negotiation over the details of increased home rule.  In turn the referendum has spurred calls for increased local powers and franchise for both England and Wales with calls for each to have their own individual parliaments deciding on regional matters while the Union Parliament decides on matters of national and international importance. With next years general election this is likely to become a key issue in deciding the political landscape.

Image:  Treaty of Union which agreed the terms of the Union between England and Scotland, it was made law when the Acts of Union were assented to by the English and Scottish parliaments in 1706 and 1707 respectively. (source)

We want to be wanted.

So much of what we do in life is little more than a silent scream begging for someone to pay attention to us. Please see me, please love me, please don’t hate me. 

We create art, we share online, we laugh at jokes and we go out and about so people that will see us. So they’ll see what we love, hope they feel the same and on some level connect.

There are always, and always will be people, talking about the human condition who some how continually miss the one fundamental truth.

We want to be wanted by the ones we want. 

Be it wanting our family to notice us, strangers to see us, lovers to hold us, or friends to ask how we are doing. We want to be wanted. We will keep our mouths shut and never tell a soul that is so many words; but with every action we take, we will yell, fight and rip ourselves apart in order to be noticed. Just one compliment, just one like, just one word, to let us know that we mean something. 

It always seems easier to say nothing and just hope someone takes the time to look in on us, ask us what’s going on in our world. But you can be that person for someone else.

We can reply to that text, phone that one person, reach out to an old friend, that weird kid at school, or the jerk at work that no one really understands. It’s not hard to make someone feel a little more worth while. 

I won’t put words into your mouth, but how about this for starters, a wave, a smile, a few moments to see how their day is going. Ask about their life.

You may even have someone turn their head and notice you in return. They might smile, they could wave, or they may just ask to spend time with you. It’s not a bad thing to be noticed from time to time. Trust me. You may even grow to like it. 

Be your own.

One of the toughest things about working with photography and cinematography is not being jealous of every good shot you see, that you’ve not taken. Trying to mimic everyone else’s really cool style; be it in composition, lighting and editing, although can be educational, isn’t always conductive to finding your own flow. It’s important to pick and choose so that you can create your own art and feel each time you produce an image. An image that reflects what you want to portray, not limited by the confines you’ve places on yourself through comparison. 

lyrafay

frequently-kates:

THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT GUYS LISTEN UP

If you like dogs, have a dog, or happen to be a decent human being then please, please, PLEASE listen

Harlan are the UK’s last remaining breeders of beagles for use in experiments.

This company breeds beagles for the purpose of selling them to laboratories and universities and keep ‘donor beagles’

These dogs have their blood regularly drained and sold to laboratories and are subject to numerous experiments.

Some of these experiments include ‘toxicology experiments’ which entail the dogs wearing muzzles and being forced to inhale toxic substances such as cigarettes, bleach and oven cleaner.

If they aren’t killed during experiments, they’re eventually deemed useless and euthanised

A former employee reported to the Sunday Times that these poor beagles:

• are being punched and kicked by employees

• have profanities shaved into their fur and their faces daubed with felt tips

• are kept in dirty, cramped pens

These beagles are born to endure such a high level of pain and suffering that they self harm, kill themselves or each other

These beagles are being used in experiments because they are vulnerable and controllable and can’t make it stop.

If you’re a decent human being, please don’t just ignore this and bury your head in the sand because THIS IS HAPPENING TO PUPPIES RIGHT NOW and it takes less than 2 minutes of your time to bring them closer to seeing sunshine, breathing fresh air, going on walks and being loved and cuddled by someone who wants to take care of them

Please stop these poor dogs from suffering. They don’t have a voice to stop their pain and get help, but you do.

Please, be their voice, and sign here: PETITION

For more information: Click here